Computer Science Studies (BIT)

This fourm is created by Sir Muhammad Tahir Farooq. The purpose of creating this fourm to share information the students.
 
HomeHome  RegisterRegister  Log inLog in  
Aslam-O-Alikum!
Search
 
 

Display results as :
 
Rechercher Advanced Search
Calender
Latest topics
» Chapter #1 Complete MCQ's (PART-1)
Tue Feb 24, 2015 6:00 am by Shaheer

» Windows Operating System (COMPLETE)
Mon Jan 26, 2015 10:17 am by shaista

» Computer Architecture (COMPLETE)
Sun Jan 25, 2015 5:52 am by shaista

» A virus that create more folders in your computer
Tue Jan 06, 2015 3:49 am by tahir48

» Browsers Comparision
Tue Jan 06, 2015 3:39 am by tahir48

» WEb to PDF convert
Sun Jan 04, 2015 7:34 am by shaista

» 7th Class Computer paper 1st 2 Chapters
Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:21 pm by shaista

» 8th Class Computer Paper 1st 2 chapters
Mon Dec 08, 2014 6:16 pm by shaista

» Chapter # 1 9th Class
Mon Dec 08, 2014 2:52 am by shaista

Poll
Top posters
Admin
 
shaista
 
tahir48
 
computerstudent18
 
computerstudent29
 
thompson john
 
Shaheer
 
Statistics
We have 30 registered users
The newest registered user is benish

Our users have posted a total of 214 messages in 210 subjects
Flag Counter

Share | 
 

 Classification Of Computers (Complete Detail)

Go down 
AuthorMessage
tahir48



Posts : 47
Join date : 2012-10-31

PostSubject: Classification Of Computers (Complete Detail)   Wed Sep 11, 2013 12:28 pm

1.29 Classification of computers
 
Computers are available in different size and powers. Different computers have different capabilities. Today’s we classified computers in four groups are as:
·         Super computers
·         Main frame computers
·         Mini computers
·         Microcomputers
 
1.29.1 Super Computers
Supercomputers were introduced in the 1960s and were designed primarily by Seymour Cray at Control Data Corporation(CDC), and later at Cray Research. While the supercomputers of the 1970s used only a few processors, in the 1990s, machines with thousands of processors began to appear and by the end of the 20th century, massively parallel supercomputers with tens of thousands of "off-the-shelf" processors were the norm (A standard, model or pattern regarded as typical). Supercomputers are used for highly calculation-intensive tasks such as problems including quantum physicsweather forecastingclimate researchoil and gas explorationmolecular modeling (computing the structures and properties of chemical compounds, biological macromolecules, polymers, and crystals), and physical simulations (such as simulation of airplanes in wind tunnels, simulation of the detonation of nuclear weapons, and research into nuclear fusion).
 
1.29.2 Mainframe Computers
Mainframe computers (colloquially referred to as "big iron") are computers used primarily by corporate and governmental organizations for critical applications, bulk data processing such as census, industry and consumer statistics, enterprise resource planning, and transaction processing. The term originally referred to the large cabinets that housed the central processing unit and main memory of early computers.
 
1.29.3 Mini Computers
A minicomputer is a class of smaller computers that evolved in the mid-1960s and sold for much less than mainframe and mid-size computers from IBM and its direct competitors. When single-chip CPUs appeared, beginning with the Intel 4004 in 1971, the term "minicomputer" came to mean a machine that lies in the middle range of the computing spectrum, in between the smallest mainframe computers and the microcomputers.
 


 
1.29.4 Micro Computers
A microcomputer is a small, relatively inexpensive computer with a microprocessor as its central processing unit (CPU). It includes a microprocessor, memory, and input/output (I/O) facilities. Microcomputers became popular in the 1970s and 80s with the advent of increasingly powerful microprocessors. The predecessors to these computers, mainframes and minicomputers, were comparatively much larger and more expensive (though indeed present-day mainframes such as the IBM System z machines use one or more custom microprocessors as their CPUs). Many microcomputers (when equipped with a keyboard and screen for input and output) are also personal computers (in the generic sense).
 
1.29.5 Pocket computer
A pocket computer is a small calculator sized handheld programmable computer. This specific category of computers existed primarily in the 1980s. Manufacturers included CasioHewlett-PackardSharpTandy/Radio Shack (Selling Casio and Sharp models under their own TRS line) and many more.
The programming language was usually BASIC, but some devices offered alternatives. For example the Casio PB-2000 could be programmed in Assembly, BASIC, C, and Lisp. An important feature of pocket computers was that all programming languages were available for the device itself, not downloaded from a cross-compiler on a larger computer.
 
1.29.6 Laptop Computer
A laptop computer is a personal computer for mobile use. A laptop has most of the same components as a desktop computer, including a display, a keyboard, a pointing device such as a touchpad (also known as a ( track pad ) and/or a pointing stick, and speakers into a single unit. A laptop is powered by mains electricity via an AC adapter, and can be used away from an outlet using a rechargeable battery. Laptops are also sometimes called notebook computers, notebooks, ultra books or net books.
 
1.29.7 Desktop Computers
A desktop computer is a personal computer (PC) in a form intended for regular use at a single location, as opposed to a mobile laptop or portable computer. Early desktop computers are designed to lie flat on the desk, while modern towers stand upright. Most modern desktop computers have separate screens and keyboards. There are two types of desktop computers Macintosh & Personal Computer.  
Back to top Go down
 
Classification Of Computers (Complete Detail)
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» TOTAL DETAIL Sd Kfz 252, 253 & early 250
» Complete meal cooking
» 95 DCM Impala Complete Part Out
» Trailer Park Boys Complete Series DVDRip
» New from Resicast

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
Computer Science Studies (BIT) :: Classes :: 9th Standard-
Jump to: